Unpunished Crimes

the-butler-movie-unpunished-crimes

Few days ago, I watched the movie “The Butler”. It’s Loosely based on the real life of Eugene Allen, a black American.

Eugene Allen, the main character mother was raped by a white man in the farm where his family was enslaved, and his father got shot by the same man, both in front of him when he was about 9 years old.

Later he became a house negro or butler in the white house for 34 years, and the movie is all about the events in the white house and in America during the years 1960s.

What shocked me and disturbed me deeply was Why he has never looked back and tracked down the killer of his father and the raper of his mother and seek justice or revenge to clean his mother honour and his father death?

I usually wonder, why black people are not tracking down the authors and the families of the people who enslaved, colonized raped and killed their ancestors, or one of their family member.

In Europe, Jews still track down the Nazis and their descendants.

If you kill a member of my family, we are 200 strong brothers and sisters who have sacred vow to seek justice for any of us regardless of the time and the circumstances. I either lead the pack or one of mine will.

Unpunished crime leads to more crime.

Today, January 17, marks the 53 years anniversary of the assassination by Belgium troop of an African hero, Patrice Lumumba. This crime is still unpunished.

We have to give him justice!

Mawuna Remarque KOUTONIN

About Mawuna Remarque KOUTONIN

Mawuna Koutonin is a world peace activist who relentlessly works to empower people to express their full potential and pursue their dreams, regardless of their background. He is the Editior of SiliconAfrica.com, Founder of Goodbuzz.net, and Social activist for Africa Renaissance. Koutonin’s ultimate dream is to open a world-class human potential development school in Africa in 2017. If you are interested in learning more about this venture or Koutonin’s other projects, you can reach him directly by emailing at mk@linkcrafter.com.

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12 Responses to “Unpunished Crimes”

  1. RUSINGIZA King David

    that still the same question in RWANDA but thanks to the government help people to live in peace towards a better future of every RWANDAN
    come and see you will find what to tell others for sure i like this page keep going we are proud of you siliconafrica

    Reply
  2. Bo Darville

    A world peace activist advocating vengeance murder? Were you born a retard, or did you have to eat a lot of paint chips to become this fucking ignorant?

    Reply
  3. Mawuna R. Koutonin

    This article is calling for Justice and punishing an unpunished crimes.
    Vengeance doesn't necessary mean murder. you can take revenge by bringing someone to court, or listing publicly the names of the families who owned slaves, raped, traded or murdered slave.

    Do you think the descendants of the slaves traders received any inheritance from their fathers or forefathers (money, land, etc.)?

    Peace depends on justice, and Justice is importance for Peace.

    Reply
  4. Mawuna R. Koutonin

    This article is calling for Justice and punishing an unpunished crimes.
    Vengeance doesn't necessary mean murder. you can take revenge by bringing someone to court, or listing publicly the names of the families who owned slaves, raped, traded or murdered slave.

    Do you think the descendants of the slaves traders received any inheritance from their fathers or forefathers (money, land, etc.)?

    Peace depends on justice, and Justice is importance for Peace.

    Reply
  5. Jim Fisher

    Collective punishment is against the Genova convention I would like too see hanging in The Hague

    Reply
  6. Aditya Govilkar

    Mawuna R. Koutonin By that definition, shouldn't the entire nation of Mongolia be completely punished for genocide that their ancestors committed under Genghis Khan? They went unpunished for that. Lets also go to the Middle East and track down the descendents of the Assyrian Empire because their ancestors brutally conquered and terrorized vast populations in the area. The Koreans should track down the survivors of the Chinese dynasties which authorized invasions into their kingdoms centuries ago, causing so much chaos. There are several Polynesians who would get a lot of justice by punishing the descendents of the Maori tribes.

    The thing is, there are no populations on this planet, not even Aztecs, Polynesians, native Americans, the myriad kingdoms and tribes of Africa such as Mali, the Bantu, and so on, which have not totally screwed with the ancestors of other populations, who in their turn have done the same to other populations at other times. There have been crimes and horrors in history equivalent to slavery and even greater than it. History is full of unpunished crimes. If an individual harms you, you punish this individual. You do not go after the individuals children, or grandchildren. That just makes you a monster who preys against innocents.

    Reply
  7. Mawuna R. Koutonin

    Aditya Govilkar I understand you, but I'm talking about the people who were responsible of the slavery industry, and committed crimes.

    I don't know about the other topics you mentioned in your response.

    Reply
  8. Aditya Govilkar

    Mawuna R. Koutonin Haven't those people been dead for years?

    The descendents of slavers or slave owners are not responsible for the acts committed by their ancestors. They weren't even born back then.

    The author says: "I usually wonder, why black people are not tracking down the authors and the families of the people who enslaved, colonized raped and killed their ancestors, or one of their family member."

    It doesn't make sense to me that the families and descendents of the actual criminals are punished for crimes that happened before they were born. How is a person who did not exist when a crime happened, responsible for it? Let's even assume that if slavery ended 20 years ago (there are parts of the world where it hasn't, though), and there are people responsible for slavery still around. It makes sense to go after these individuals, but to go after family members who had nothing to do with their acts is just targeting innocents, and that makes one a monster.

    Reply
  9. Mawuna R. Koutonin

    Aditya Govilkar Don't you think the descendants benefited from the crimes of their ancestors?

    if they've got benefits from the crimes of their ancestors, would they accept to renounce the lands, the businesses, the bank accounts and properties of their ancestors? Would they accept to shame their families and ancestor for their misdeeds and therefore renounce the high social status and privileges they've inherited because of the crimes of their ancestors?

    Keep in mind that, before the transatlantic slavery of Black people, Europe was like any other place in the world in term of wealth. As a matter of fact, in the 14th century, when the Mongols army arrived in Europe they were very disappointed, because the place was so poor. There was nothing worthy looting, so as usual they killed the local aristocracies, and return back home.

    However, after 3 centuries of Black people slavery, Western Europe became 3 times richer than any other region in the world, and after 2 centuries of colonialism around the world, western Europe became 30 times wealthier than any other region of the world at the beginning of the 20th century.

    The compounding result is that nowadays western Europeans and their descendants owns close to 90% of the world wealth, while they make less than 15% of world population.

    For less than 3,5% of the world population American owns 39% percent of world’s wealth, while Western Europe accounts for another 31% of global wealth with a total population less than 6% of the world population.

    Here this article on the subject: http://www.siliconafrica.com/help-europe-black-man-burden/

    Reply
  10. Aditya Govilkar

    Mawuna R. Koutonin I'm going to assume that this isn't about getting property, land, and financial benefits, and that this is about getting justice for crimes that happened in the past.

    So, I'll respond by repeating that this line of thinking would justify nearly everyone going after every other population on the planet. Everyone's descendents have benefited from the crimes of their ancestors…and also the luck, hard work, and sheer foolishness, of their ancestors. Some have benefited in terms of property and finance, others by positions, others by location and geography, others by pride, others by culture, and so on.

    Why stick to the crime to slavery? Why not go after the descendents of historical individuals who have committed any and every crime? Why stick to just populations? Why not use this logic on individuals as well?

    Your great grandfather was part of a group of robbers who stole from caravans 86 years ago? Pay up or be imprisoned.

    Your ancestors went on a killing spree across most of the known world 800 years ago, slaughtering millions, razing prosperous cities to the ground, and leaving fields of bones in their wake? Punish every Mongolian.

    And you know where this gets darker? It gets darker when this descendents-responsible-for-ancestors theory to justify doing things like screwing the Middle Eastern Arabs because their ancestors came out of Arabia in the 7th century and conquered Christian holy cities and territory that had belonged to the Eastern Roman Empire for a long time. They must be punished for this. Lets…lets call what we do to them a crusade, and continue it for a thousand years until modern day.

    The Georgians from the Caucasus have beef against most southern Europe, most of the Middle East and Central Asia, and Russia, because they have also been subject to slavery for so long. Their women were especially enslaved for their beauty, in the Ottoman Empire.

    Let's also track down the descendents of the African tribal chieftains who were also complicit in slavery.

    Let us find the blood of the Mali Empire and punish their descendents for killing and conquering their way across Western Africa.

    Additionally, the slavery of Africans by the Arabs and the Muslims started much earlier, ended much later, was a more brutal process, and included more individuals being made slaves. You don't mention them at all.

    You cannot ignore all this by stating that you are only talking about slavery, and only slavery in Northern America and Western Europe.

    You cannot ignore the other crimes committed in history by the rest of the world by stating that you do not know about them.

    They are all valid if the idea that an innocent individual should be made to pay for the crime of his/her/its ancestors.

    Have none of your ancestors committed a crime? Mine sure have. Everyone's ancestors have.

    Who cares about what wealth these societies have (although the reason they got here is much more complicated than what you've stated.)? This isn't an issue about penalizing only the wealthy descendents, is it? This is about justice. And justice does not care if the person responsible is a tycoon or a beggar. Justice applies everywhere, and to everyone.

    Reply
  11. Mawuna R. Koutonin

    Aditya Govilkar
    First, This post is about one subject. You can feel free to extend it to other topics, but I don't know well about them as you do.
    Second, you can not separate economical injustice from justice as social tool for peace.

    Reply
  12. Aditya Govilkar

    Mawuna R. Koutonin

    The point of bringing up those other subjects and topics was to show how easily the argument used in the article can be used to a ridiculous effect by everyone with a grievance from more than a hundred years ago, which is basically, everybody alive. I DONT want it extended to other topics, because it is not a viable proposition. Everyone would try to penalize everyone if we hold innocent descendents responsible for the crimes of their ancestors. You don't need to know about these topics or history in order to see how an idea like that justifies so much cruelty and foolishness. This makes the argument used in the article irrational.

    I did not say one should separate economic injustice from justice. I said justice includes more than economic justice. And so it should ALSO be applied in contexts where economic justice is not an issue, which the article does not do at all. By only asking for penalties to be levied upon individuals who have allegedly benefited economically, in order to get economic benefits, this article is what separates economic injustice from actual justice. Not me.

    Reply

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